Landing a Nanny Job

Here are my best tips for starting off as a nanny:

  • Create a profile on Care.com. This is where I found all of my families and good leads. I also registered on Sittercity.com, which is another decent website for finding care jobs.
  • Design a creative resume… or find someone to help you do so. I believe my beautifully designed resume was the key to my success in finding a job. Checkout etsy.com for ideas or to purchase a template. In order to share the link on Care.com with a free profile, upload your resume to the web and then write out the address (e.g. tinyurl dot com slash yourresume) so that the recipient can access it directly. This is a sneaky shortcut but my families loved it. If you feel uncomfortable doing this, just don’t include your contact info on your resume. Instead, put your Care.com direct profile URL. 
  • Write a professional, intelligent cover letter. There are hundreds… thousands… of others out there looking to land the same jobs you are, but a lot of them aren’t polished and professional. You will stand out from the crowd if you craft a good cover letter. I wrote my cover letter in a Google doc and put a generic “Dear _____,” at the top, then I would cut and paste that into the application and place the name listed on the ad in the blank spot. 
  • Decide what you want. There are so many different types of jobs out there… decide what you are looking for so you can apply for the right type of jobs. Do you want to work full time or part time? In your home or someone else’s? Are you looking to take on multiple children from multiple families? What is your availability? 
  • Research Your State’s Childcare Laws. In my state, I can legally care for no more than two children (not related to me) at the same time before I have to officially register as an in-home daycare. I don’t have the space for more than this anyway so I purposefully keep to this two-child limit. Research your own state to determine the proper laws. Check to see if your state classifies you as a contract employee or a household employee. Depending on which it is will depend on how you pay taxes on your wages. If your employer isn’t pulling taxes for you, make sure you set aside funds to pay those taxes at the end of the year. 
  • Search. Search. Search. It took me several months to land my first job. I combed through ads on Care.com and similar websites. Apply for as many jobs as possible that fit your criteria. Follow up swiftly when a family replies with an interest in your services. 
  • Interview. Perhaps this goes without saying but make sure you are professional and polished when interviewing. Dress up, wear make-up (ladies), use good posture. Obviously show genuine interest in the child(ren). But make sure you look put-together. These families are looking for someone to care for their most precious treasures… they need to have confidence that you have your act together. 
  • Create a Contract. I cannot stress this enough. If your family won’t agree to sign a contract (even for just part-time work), don’t commit. Both parties deserve to be on the same page with every aspect of the family-nanny relationship. I’ll be posting my sample contract soon.

 


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About

Hi, I'm Lauren. Mommy to two, nanny to two, wife, teacher, homemaker, Catholic, artist, writer, friend, sister, daughter. Here you'll find everything from updates about our family, info and advice about parenting and homemaking, or pretty much anything else I feel like writing. Welcome!